Cotton Court Business Centre

Spotlight

Spotlight On Success: GetStaffed

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Our ‘Spotlight On Success’ series takes a look at the people we work with, to showcase their talent and look at what really makes them successful.  

 

We’re big believers that it’s important for entrepreneurs & business owners to surround themselves with successful people. It’s not just about networking or getting advice from others. The people you interact with on a daily basis can impact upon the way you feel, think and act. We’re proud to have a wide network of successful, driven & experienced clients and contacts to surround ourselves with, and provide our clients with an environment conducive to successful business.

 

In this edition, we turn our attention to fifth floor resident success story, GetStaffed. They’ve received a considerable amount of attention recently, with a string of high value client wins and continuous growth.

 

Who are they?

GetStaffed are a Preston based staffing solution provider, with a national footprint. They’re headed by young entrepreneurs Tom Havlin & Tom Craig, two highly driven individuals who aren’t afraid to get their hands dirty.  

Tom Havlin (Managing Director) & Tom Craig (Operations Manager)

 

What do they do?

They’ve got a proven track record of providing high quality staff for the events and promotions industry. They don’t just recruit and supply a team, they invest in the personal development of their staff, meaning their clients receive the absolute best in service and expertise. They provide everything from bar staff and managers, to brand promotion teams and mobile bars.

 

Find out more about what they do here…

 

Who do they work with?

GetStaffed work with clients across the UK of various sizes, predominantly in the events and promotions sectors. They’ve provided mobile bars for small functions, through to large teams for established festivals like Creamfields & large venues such as Victoria Warehouse.

 

They’re in high demand, meaning that they’re constantly recruiting and training high quality staff for events across the country, 7 days a week. If you know someone who might be suitable, fill in an application form here…

What makes them successful?

The drive and determination of the directors and management is without a doubt one of the key critical success factors for GetStaffed. The ‘hands on’ approach from these individuals ensures that the company ethos is adhered to at all times, and their reputation grows from strength to strength.

 

Jack Barron, Marketing Director at Cotton Court says:

 

“In addition to strong leadership, a considerable factor in their success is the amount they invest in their own people. The training and routes of progression offered to their staff ensures ‘buy in’ from people at all levels of the business.

 

The management are approachable, but more importantly, they care about the individuals who work for them as much as they do their clients. That is how you win and retain high quality, loyal staff. It’s these staff that are their true selling point and are the foundation of their extremely good reputation.”

 

When asked what he thought made them successful, Managing Director of GetStaffed, Tom Havlin said:

Tom Havlin, Managing Director, GetStaffed

“We’ve built a solid reputation for being reliable and for providing high quality of staff to events across the country. I think our major point of difference, what sets us apart from our competitors, is the time and money we spend on the development of our team, whether that be team building and social activities, or personal professional development.

 

 

 

 

 

We’ve got a big team, but myself and Tom Craig know every single one of them, and we’re always at the events ensuring the reputation of the brand is upheld. We’ve had some big client wins recently which are helping to stimulate the growth of the business, with much of that additional revenue going back into staff training and development. We believe we’re successful because of the people we work with, and we win their commitment and loyalty by demonstrating it ourselves.”

 

How can you find them?

You can get in touch with GetStaffed by email at: info@getstaffeduk.com

Visit their website at: http://www.getstaffeduk.com/

Or call them on: 01772 921107

Spotlight On Success: UK Media & Events

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As part of our ‘Spotlight On Success’ series, we’re looking at some of the success stories from our Cotton Court community both past and present.

We’re immensely proud of the people we work with, and want to give praise where praise is due! We’re massive believers that you are a product of the company we keep, so it’s important to us to work closely with our successful clients and to nurture the up and coming businesses that call our 19th century mill home.

To launch the series, we’re looking at UK Media & Events (UKMAE) who’ve been residents of Cotton Court’s second floor for nearly 2 years.

Who are they?

UKMAE are a full service creative media & events company that operate nationally across a variety of sectors. They’ve got over 30 years industry experience, and the team is made up from a diverse set of skills and backgrounds.

What do they do?

UKMAE don’t like to be pigeonholed. One week they may be running a conference, the next they’re doing a Christmas light switch on. No two weeks are the same, which is owed and contributes to their varied experience and adaptability over 30 years.

They conceive, plan & manage events, and they do it well. Their client base ranges from SME’s and local councils, to international brands. Their services are truly scalable and bespoke to the requirement of each client.

Their wide ranging experience means they’re well positioned to design & create every aspect of the print, digital, merchandise and display materials that accompany your events or marketing campaigns. In addition they can even arrange sponsorship opportunities at major events, aligning your brand with the perfect target audience and gaining you maximum exposure.

Find out more about what they do here…

 

Who do they work with?

UKMAE have a long client list from small SME’s, through to brands like Vauxhall, United Utilities, UCLan, Lancashire County Council, Kia, international giants Bauer media group and many more. Their scope of operations are national, but their home is here in Lancashire, and we’re incredibly happy to have them as part of the community here at Cotton Court. They’re certainly well known and considered some of the bigger personalities within the building!

   

What makes them successful?

Their wide range of skills and experience make them adaptable and of course contribute to their success. But from an outsider looking in, it’s clear that the personalities within the team, as well as their drive and passion for events is what really gives them their point of difference and ‘X-Factor’.

Jack Barron, Marketing Director at Cotton Court says:

“From a business perspective the ability to scale their services and overall operation is a huge asset, as is their extensive network of contacts and suppliers.

In an ever changing marketplace, and indeed world, the ability to adapt to the environment & requirements of the market is the key to success, and these guys have a great ability to do that”

When asked what he thought made them successful, Managing Director of UK Media & Events, Danny Bee says: “ We have spent years within the industry harvesting a network of suppliers that we wholeheartedly trust, enabling us to leverage their varying skill-sets to produce the best service possible for our clients, offering great solutions for any budget. Our business model is based on our great relationship with our suppliers enabling us to provide one element of an event, from a single piece of equipment hire to absolutely everything often at a price no more than if our client was to source it all themselves and doing all the work in the process.

How can you find them?

You can get in touch with UKMAE by e-mail at: hello@ukmae.com

Visit their website www.ukmae.com

Or call them at: 0800 999 4414

 

Guest Blog – Doug Melia Safer Handling

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The Department for Education document entitled “Use of Reasonable Force – updated advice for head teachers, staff and governing bodies” isn’t a new thing. Variations of it have been around for some time now and I have yet to meet two organisations who interpret it in the same way.

Tonight I want to invite you to join me on a journey and using the principleground rules from the 1999 (make you feel old?) film “Fight Club”, to examine further some of the challenges staff may face when dealing specifically withmanaging children fighting.

#1 The first rule of Fight Club is: You do not talk about Fight Club.

The DfE guidance document addresses issues surrounding the use of force without discussing them in detail. The document highlights that staff are allowed to use force to:

“prevent a pupil from attacking a member of staff or another pupil, or to stop a fight in the playground”

This artfully vague statement gives the nod to staff having the power to“stop” fights, it doesn’t then give any further detail on the matter.

In one of my earlier posts I discussed duty of care and keeping yourself safe whilst weighing up the duty owed to those in your care, the guidance explains this as:

“The decision on whether or not to physically intervene is down to the professional judgement of the staff member concerned and should always depend on the individual circumstances.”

Reasonable force is something we have discussed in detail before, staff must ensure that any actions they take are reasonable in the circumstances. Meaning, should they be intervening in the first place? Could the circumstances have been avoided?

#2 Second rule: DO NOT talk about Fight Club

So important was its secrecy to the integrity of the club, it was listed twice. So lets look at a different angle. Don’t talk about it?  The guidance skirts around questions such as: At what point do we stop the fight? With how many members of staff? What determines a fight? Play-fights also? Verbal warning first? Using which holds?

Staff  are told to use their professional judgement, without the necessary information, instruction, training & supervision that decision may not necessarily be in the best interests of the child. So perhaps we should talk about it, I always ask when delivering training if anyone has had to break up a fight before, and if the person is comfortable enough, I get them to discuss the circumstances. Without fail, the person describing their experience always animates their disclosure using hand gestures, often which resemble a person swimming or attempting to swim.

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In the heat of the moment where a fight breaks out next to them or they round a corner and a member of staff is confronted with an advancing pupil, then the immediate physical reaction to separate or “hold back” an individual can often be instinctive. Pushing, pulling, stopping a child running in a corridor, catching a chair from tipping back or even turning a pupil by their shoulders and diverting them away from a confrontation all involve gross motor skills. Separating two parties is often a more preferable approach than wading in with some kind of fine or moderate motor skill based single person restrictive hold, which aside from having manual handling and personal safety implications, may result in more serious repercussions to explain.

Imagine sitting with Mum, explaining how you held her dearest Tyler whilst the other child hit him as hard as he could in his ear, with the  “free shot” you granted his aggressor. Might not be your finest hour at this year’s parents evening 

#3 Third rule: If someone says “stop” or goes limp, taps out the fight is over

Now, one thing I have observed about the majority of young children and fighting is; they aren’t very good at it.

Proportionately (which if we do need to intervene is exactly how we should be thinking) it may not be the best idea to wade in and try to stop the fight physically.  Take me for example, I am 6ft 3, 17 stone and have hands well, to give a clue to a nickname I once had “like shovels”. If two small children were fighting and I grabbed them and dragged them backwards separating them – I guarantee I would cause more harm to both of those children than if I had just let them carry on fighting!

I’m not saying that I would stand and watch, The point here is just because you have a power to do something does not mean you must use it, your duty of care both to yourself and the children  is absolute.

#4 Fourth rule: One fight at a time

Admittedly, sometimes there’s a lot of effort, a lot of shirt pulling, spinning round and grabbing but generally there is usually one party (or both) that have entered into this bout of fisticuffs fairly reluctantly. I’m not suggesting we just stand and watch or take a sweep-stake perhaps. If there is time to look at a less intrusive method, which is likely to work, resulting in a lesser harm occurring then surely where it isn’t necessary to use force, we shouldn’t? The very presence of an adult can sometimes be enough, or a clear confident and audible command could stop children in their tracks or even less than that? I mean, ask yourself why the children are fighting?

Not why they have started fighting, now that could be a variety of things, from misappropriated Match Attaxx cards in a primary school setting to a negligent“Like” on Facebook in secondary. No, why are they continuing to fight? In the film, one fight at a time meant having an audience – it may be more appropriate (and far more effective) in some circumstances to evict the crowd chanting“Fight, fight, fight!” before you consider physically intervening. Once the eyes are away from them, the fight in the duo often fizzles out.

Then sanctions against those encouraging the fighting could be a good way of instigating a cultural shift in your establishment, condemning fights as a spectator sport to being a thing of the past.

 #5 Fifth rule: No shirts, no shoes

As specific as the character in the film Tyler Durden was on fightwear, the guidance put out there by the government is specific in the detail of the fight’s location. Why a playground was my initial reaction? Don’t fights occur in other areas? Is there a difference that we need to be made aware of? Is it only “a fight” if it takes place on the ground area allocated for children to play? Location may affect your assessment of the situation but other than that plays no significant part in lawfully intervening.

Escorting a child from one side of a school to the other for example – legally is there a power to do so? Yes, absolutely the power exists. I have previously written posts explaining the legalities of restriction of liberty and the use of time out rooms, practically though is it always the best option to attempt, with their resistance to get them there? Police stations, prisons and hospitals are all ergonomically designed to allow staff to easily escort people who don’t want to be moved from one place to another. Think about it, wide corridors, ramps, laminated wall displays instead of pictures and ornaments, doors that open electronically or both ways and what is on the floors? Nothing. What happens to said floors in the evening? The floors are cleaned and buffed, partly for hygiene but it is easier to move those resisting than if they had the purchase of carpet beneath their feet.

Classrooms? Rows of chairs housing other children. Corridors? narrow, with amazing wall displays, doors that open inwards with fiddly handles and stairs. Yes stairs – I have a talent of falling UP stairs when I am at home, happy and calm. What then are my chances of successfully managing a challenging student and collaborating the movements of another colleague DOWN a flight of stairs when I am in a state of high emotional arousal? That risk assessment is not even worth attempting.

So as with any manual handling activity we must ask – do we need to move the object (child) in the first place? What is so urgent that we must immediately move the child?

#6 Sixth rule: Only two guys to a fight fellas

Do numbers matter? Numbers of staff? Number of people fighting? Well let us look at other activities, take moving a box for example. Your employer asks you to take a box down a flight of stairs, you survey it and on testing its weight find the object to be far heavier than you feel you could safely lift.

So, having been asked you lift it anyway and carry it through a classroom, stumbling due to its weight or shape. Subsequently, you and the pupil who broke your fall are now injured.

Would the staff member concerned be apportioned some of the blame? Yes of course the employer would have to by law produce a risk assessment for this activity but should the staff member themselves not have raised the fact that this assigned work activity was outside of their range of capabilities?

#7 Seventh rule: Fights will go on as long as they have to

The key is to stop incidents, but only when safe. If we look at two teenagers or even year 6 pupils in a primary school settings and make a bit of a threat assessment. Are the fighters big? Strong? Quick? Are they more able than ourselves? Or to rephrase, do we think that we actually could control them? Could we physically over power them to make them stop fighting? Is the likelihood of us succeeding in stopping the fight alone outweighed by these factors?

Removing classes of students using strategies to win time to call for help through containing pupils, moving objects and potential weapons out of reach, reminding pupils that the police are on their way are sometimes better alternatives than exercising your power to intervene, getting injured and failing in your duty of care.

#8 The eighth: and final rule…

Thanks for taking the time to read this post, I hope it has been helpful if the links a little tenuous at times. Even if you aren’t a teacher, or you don’t work in schools, I’m sure you can see how this conveys to other settings and promotes an overall compliance with the human rights act. Ideally if we can isolate the triggers and target low level behaviours looking at sanctions & rewards rather than threats, we can minimise the residual risks of fights ever happening in the first place.

So, are you ready? Oh didn’t I say? As this is your first night at fight club.

Diecut UK grows from strength to strength!

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Diecut UK is a global company that specialises in the supply of Corrugated, Packaging, Print & Print Finishing Machinery.

What is diecutting? – Diecutting is a process of anything cut to shape out of corrugated board or card, rigid PVS and plastics using a steel rule die.

We have machines placed all around the world that vary in shape and size, depending on the material being cut.

We strive to be innovators and work tirelessly to stay at the forefront of our industry and with over 20 years of experience, we have developed a global network of distributors and customers.

In recent months the team at Diecut UK has been revitalised, with additions made to the Operations, Commercial and Marketing teams and representatives worldwide, Diecut UK is going from strength to strength.

Andy from Billboard PR1 – Big Fast for a Big Cause

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One of our great customers Andy Neale is taking part in a Zimbabwean style fast this week to raise money for a charity that is close to his heart- Progressio.

Andy has just returned from spending six whole months in Nicaragua living off rice and beans helping a remote community adapt to Climate Change. The fast is part of a project called ZimFast. ZimFast is a fundraising challenge to raise vital funds for Progressio’s work alongside people living in poverty. The challenge allow you to stand in solidarity with communities in poor and fragile countries like Zimbabwe, and take a glimpse into the lack of choice that extreme poverty brings.

Andy is just wanting £3 from 11 people to reach his target with his partner and friend. So if you haven’t done your ‘good dead of the day’ do it now!

You can read more here and donate here!

Remploy Celebrate 100,000 job successes!

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Remploy, the leading provider of specialist employment support for disabled people and those with health conditions, celebrated International Day of Disabled People at Waterloo.

Remploy, the leading provider of specialist employment support for disabled people and those with health conditions, today (3 December) celebrated International Day of Disabled People and passing the milestone of supporting 100,000 people into work since 2010.

Celebrations were held in the Preston branch here at Cotton Court.

Beth Carruthers, Remploy Chief Executive, said: “IDDP is a day to celebrate the talents and achievements of disabled people around the world.  It promotes ability and showcases what is possible in order to break down barriers through increased understanding.

“IDDP is also an opportunity to challenge ourselves and others to do more to create an inclusive society and workplaces that truly benefit from the ability of all. We are immensely proud of having supported 100,000 people into life-changing employment.

“Achieving this remarkable milestone is testament to the strong relationships we have with employers large and small, who recognise the business benefits of employing disabled people.

“But we all agree there is still so much more to do,” Mrs Carruthers said.

Referring to the Government’s Disability Confident campaign, Justin Tomlinson said: “We have to make businesses confident enough to introduce them to organisations like Remploy. We can provide the support to employers if they make the investment and they will find that it makes good business sense.

“Our commitment, personally from the Prime Minister, is that we will halve the disability employment gap and that means improving the lives of a million people.”

(courtesy of Remploy.co.uk)

We’d like to congratulate the Remploy Preston team, it is great so see their hard work paying off.

 

GUEST BLOG: DOUG MELIA – SAFER HANDLING

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Back to the future

When should you repeat something you’ve already done? Or to rephrase, when should we recommend staff refresh their positive handling, physical intervention or restraint training?

First Aid At Work has for a while now been every 3 years, AED (Automated External Defibrillator) is recommended now every 6 months whereas some providers of positive handling have for many years operated a refresher every 3 years. I haven’t picked up a squash racquet for 3 years I wonder if I had a go this evening, if Id be any good…

Law and legislation

There is already in place a requirement that physical skills are to be periodically refreshed on a regular basis. This is supported in Health and Safety law and the associated guidance documents, one of which is the Management of health and safety at work regulations 1999.

Regulation 13 (2) states that:

“Every employer shall ensure that his employees are provided with adequate health and safety training

a) on their being recruited into the employer’s undertaking; and

b) on their being exposed to new or increased risk”

For example if new working activities are to be undertaken, a new piece of machinery is installed or, a service user or pupil presents new challenges that staff haven’t experienced or, simply aren’t prepared for. Sometimes incidents, near misses or accidents can be a reason to look at a risk assessment which could then identify a requirement for a fresh training needs analysis.

 “The training referred to in paragraph (2) shall –

a) be repeated periodically where appropriate;

b) be adapted to take account of any new or changed risks to the health and safety of the employees concerned and

c) take place during working hours

This act of parliament also refers to staff members “capabilities”;

“Employers should take account of the employees’ capabilities and the level of their training, knowledge and experience”

A risk assessment would have been carried out initially to identify which employees require training, this demonstrates compliance with the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 which states employers shall provide (in accordance with the associated risks) information, instruction, training and supervision.

Any risk assessment should be being reviewed annually as a minimum unless where there is a change identified which could affect the health, safety or well-being of staff prior to that period. So if twelve months ago this training identified staff needed training of a certain level in specific physical tasks, twelve months on can we be certain that the employees “capabilities” to perform said skills haven’t deteriorated? Even if they never use them? By that rationale, does this mean, that staff who are intervening all the time, get better through having more practice? No, not necessarily.

Practice makes permanent

Now annually, along with other CPD commitments I refresh my own instructor training in the use of force at Lilleshall national sports centre with Mark Dawes and his team at the National Federation for Personal Safety. Why do I refresh? Best practice, consistency of my delivery, to be updated on new developments in the industry and to network with like-minded professionals. In a nutshell it keeps me fresh and current. Mark did a brilliant video on consolidation and re-consolidation which inspired me to put this post out for my connections and clients explaining why we promote annual refresher training.

If staff are allowed to let their competency and ability slip through there being no positive reinforcement or constructive guidance on honing physical skills, then by repeatedly performing certain skills incorrectly, they will get very good at performing them incorrectly!

Let’s take into consideration the principle of “recall”, when someone is told,shown and they also experience something (the importance of people practising techniques and pressure testing them is of importance here) then after 3 months they are likely to recall 65% of the content.

If staff aren’t using strategies then they are likely to forget techniques far more quickly, this is why an instructional video and an accompanying manual to any physical skills course should be something employers look for when procuring training. This allows staff to re-consolidate and remind themselves of techniques between their refreshers, these are also useful for audits and to assist with debriefs. Often, positive handling or physical intervention providers are not so keen on sharing visuals, perhaps for fear of being copied, potentially held liable for the repercussions of what they have been promoting or, of being shown up on the premise that what they are teaching, which often, to put politely, should be put in a DeLorean, driven to 88mph and banished from history.

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Ask your staff how often they wish to retrain

“Employers should review their employees’ capabilities to carry out their work, as necessary. If additional training, including refresher training, is needed, it should be provided.”

Health surveillance is one way of performing a review and can take the form of peer reviews, toolbox talks or questionnaires even. Ask staff members what they would like more of, how they felt the training benefited them and if there are any newly identified challenges which certain training could help them overcome, or if the training was any good at all! If training isn’t fit for purpose, doesn’t fit the needs of the staff or service users then additional or alternative training should be considered.

I didn’t know that

Sometimes when I start to quote paragraphs of statute law and refer to sections of approved codes of practice head teachers, managers, care home owners and others in positions of authority can shrug and laugh and explain that’s not their job or, they weren’t aware of that.

“Managers should be aware of relevant legislation and should be competent to manage health and safety effectively”

Ignorance of the law is not a defence. If work schedules or time constraints prohibit you or your team from keeping abreast of current and established health and safety principles then it my be time to consider procuring a professional to assist with this. There are plenty of health and safety consultants out there –competent, qualified and registered professionals who can advise you on such vital issues and make recommendations on how the law works.

This is not 1955, this is 2015 and although Lexus have, as the ultimate art imitating life gesture provided us with the hoverboard not much else has matched up to this being the year Doc and Marty were transported to in the film “Back to the future 2”. I for one certainly don’t have a flux capacitor and we can’t yet travel back through the space time continuum to right the wrongs of ineffective physical restraint systems. There are however guidelines for providing staff with easy to remember, effective and appropriate strategies, some of which I hope I have simplified in this post (it isn’t rocket science).

GUEST BLOG: DOUG MELIA – SAFER HANDLING

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Have I got human rights for you

The thing about Human Rights is it protects humans. That means everybody…  not merely the people the Tories deci de are human. – Marcus Chown

The newly installed government are looking at replacing the existing Human Rights Act. You can’t avoid reading about this, it ‘s everywhere we look.

So what’s it all about? Is the HRA as the media often portrays it a “Villain’s charter” a ‘Get out of jail free card’ for the twenty tens?’  Well not really, rights of humans aren’t a new thing, the individual rights of people here in England originate back to the signing of Magna Carta some 800 years ago at Runnymede by Richard the Lion-heart. Since then we have seen the modern Human Rights legislation passed following the atrocities of the Second World War and the HRA as we know it receiving royal ascent here to allow us to try cases on UK soil in 1998.

Human rights information which often interlaces my presentations has all been gathered from reliable sources, published works and the newspapers.

Thanks has to go as far as legitimate resources are concerned to Edexcel’s brilliant qualification based learning on the Use of force, vast  input from my mentor on the subject of the use of force Mark Dawes, and my bedfellows and driving companions; Michael Mansfield QC, Professor Gary Slapperand the world renowned human rights lawyer John Wadham  (Amazon, iTunes and Waterstones receipts are entirely legitimate and tax deductible business expenses).

Answering queries on self-defence, pupil restraint, the searching of prisoners and which holds are safe to use with the infirm or vulnerable has over the years become a bit of a speciality for me.

“Do certain types of restraint amount to torture?” or, “If we do defend ourselves against an attacker and they are injured, then
have we breached his or her human rights?

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Questions like these are brilliant introductions which immediately seize the attention of others in the group. This allows me a public platform (something which the new charter aims to restrict further) to convey, in a language which frontline people, management & health and safety professionals alike can understand, the ways in which the law can be interpreted. Regularly I find immense job satisfaction when I can see that by passing on this information, people are empowered in their job-roles, enlightened with the facts and more often than not along the way I find I dispel a few myths, misconceptions and well, massive untruths.

Within this short 11 minute video which I have taken from a seminar I delivered at Cheshire Police HQ earlier this year is my interpretation of the HRA in relation to restraint and the use of force in general. Absolute and qualified rights are explained and without these safeguards in place I do worry if the interests of the vulnerable will be prioritised in this new charter at all.

Surely before a complete repeal, it would make sense to weigh up the alternatives, the motives for the choices that have been made and their associated consequences? Is there actually anything wrong with the law? Wouldn’t it make sense first to consider implementing;

A better awareness of the law within counter-terror, the police and in government departments, both central and local?
Improved information sharing and communication channels between these departments?
Let’s say we don’t? We give the cold shoulder to Europe and we blank a constitution, established over centuries which has been built on the sacrifices of others. Turning on our heels we throw it all away and get the first bus home? Well for the children, elderly and vulnerable members of society, it could be a long, scary walk back to say the least.

Client Success Story – EJT Associates

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One of our newest clients, EJT Associates, are going from strength to strength having secured a number of high profile contracts including Transport for London, Babcock International, Bank of New York Mellon, Keolis Amey and the London Fire Brigade.

EJT Associates Ltd is specialist provider of resilience, health and wellbeing services to a range of organisations. Their“fitforlife” brand has been specifically designed to support your resilience, health and wellbeing by delivering a range of bespoke fitforlife events including the provision of Nurses, Occupational Therapists, Personal Trainers and Nutritionists.

Russell Francis said “I am delighted to announce our new office at Cotton Court Business Centre, Preston after working from my home address for the past two years. Now in our second month of tenancy we find the building, the support and the staff to be exactly what we require in order to run our business.”

EJT are passionate in designing and providing the right event for your organisation and staff alike.
For further information on our services please visit: www.ejtassociates.co.uk / www.fitforlife.uk.net or call us on 01772 508110.

3ManFactory create video to get brands thinking!

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We first spotted this in the days running up to Lancashire Business View’s Young ‘Uns Awards. Low and behold we didn’t realise the advert lead to this very clever video from the team.

Marketing on Fleek from 3ManFactory on Vimeo.

Need to connect your brand with 18-30s or teens? Want to build brand awareness, get your products or services in front of them, or attract the best and brightest talent?

3ManFactory are experienced in delivering high performance cross-platform marketing strategies and campaigns to engage and excite youth demographics.

Our sectors specialisms include: education, fashion, technology, entertainment and consumer.

So if your brand needs to be in front of Generation Y, Z, Millennials or teens, get your marketing right or rather, on fleek. Get in touch with 3ManFactory today.